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>> charlie: all eyes were on the supreme court last week as it considered two cases involving same sex marriage. the justices heard arguments for and against the defense of marriage act and california's same-sex marriage ban, proposition 8. david boies was the colead counsel on the constitutional challenge of proposition 8. he has been at the center of the legal battle for same sex marriage since he and ted olsen first argued against the california law together in 2009. i am pleased to have david boies back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. charlie: i thank you for doing this because i want to give some sense of context and body to it. tell me the significance of the moment. these two cases being argued in the supreme court. >> i think one of the significances is just to think of how unlikely we would have thought this would have been four years ago. four years ago, to be on the verge of really quality for gay and lesbian citizens was unthinkable. we still had don't ask don't tell. you had 38% of the american people supporting marriage equality. you had a whole series of states
turned to who have warned him that it's not a secretive arm of the pentagon. >> charlie: and we conclude talking about media today and what makes it so exciting and changing. >> everything changed all at once. it's feeling like that with tie vee. a lot of people in the technology businesses or in the media businesses will tell you that once the consumer decides, it doesn't really matter. what companies decide, what gornmes decide that they're the ultimate authorities. and people decided that they want to consume television in new ways. what it threatens is business models that have been in place for many many many years. >> charlie: mazzetti and carr when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: mark mazzetti is here. he's a pulitzer prize winning national security correspondent for the "new york times." much of his reporting has focused on america's new approach to warfare. he draws on his writing for a new book called "the way of the knife: the c.
>> charlie: mark mazzetti is here. he's a pulitzer prize winning national security correspondent for the "new york times." much of his reporting has focused on america's new approach to warfare. he draws on his writing for a new book called "the way of the knife: the c.i.a., a secret army and the war at the ends of the earth." it chronicles the intelligence agency's transformation into añr para-military organization. dexter filkins writes the story of how the c.i.a. got back into the killing business is as chilling and dramatic as a spy novel. except it's true. mark mazzetti has laid out an extraordinary tale tracking the spies as they track the terrorists. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> thanks very much. charlie: so, tell me how you came to this book. >> well, i had been reporting on intelligence for about seven years now. before that i was covering the military. >> you realize when you're covering the military and the intelligence world, increasingly you realize you're covering the same thing. they have converged so much over the last 12 years in thes
... for these programs. >> charlie: we continue this evening with ben brantley of the new york times. he's a theater critic. we talk about a new noraephron play called lucky guy starring tom hanks. >> it has the sense of a really good wake. people say remember this guy, let's have another drink, let's sing about this guy. a little too much of it was told in third person for me. and i wanted to see tom hanks who i think is capable of complex portraiture be allowed to act out those moments. we only had snippetsham. >> charlie: we conclude with the performance artist. >> you know, my work and my dedication is to really lift human spirits. this is my main attention. it's so easy to put the human spirit down but it's so difficult to lift it up. like i don't like to have the art that is corrupt to destroy and how bad it is. i want to see the solutions. i want to look at the future. my work is about future. >> charlie: north korea, new play by nora ephron and marina abrahm wits when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie:
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: today the north korean government announced plans to restart its main nuclear reactor in recent weeks. both talk and action have stepped up. the isolated country mounted its third nuclear test since 2006. north korea has responded to u.n. sanctions and joined u.s. south korean military drills by declaring a state of war with its neighbor. such threats may be designed to burnish the military credentials of north korea's young leader. like the country he represents his motives and intentions remain obscure. joining me is christopher hill. he is a former u.s. ambassador to south korea and from washington d.c. mark landler of the "new york times." i am pleased to have both of them on the program. chris hill, you have dealt with the north koreans. tell me what you think of these threats. should we be taking them more seriously than in the past. >> they've certainly kind of backed themselves into a corner. that is, it's hard to imagine them getting out of this. yeah, i would ta
>> charlie: welcome to the program. we begin this evening with a breaking news story from boston where there are explosions near the finish line of the boston marathon that resulted in the death of at least two people with many others injured. here is the he can ploation captured by cameras at the scene. as we taped this program at 7:00 p.m. eastern daylight time no one has taken responsibility for the explosions and police have not acknowledged suspects. authorities found at least one other explosive device that was dismantled. president obama has directed federal authorities to provide whatever assistance is necessary to state and local authorities. he addressd the nation earlier this evening. >> we still do not know who did this or why. and people shouldn't jump to conclusions before we have all the facts. but make no mistake. we will get to the bottom of this. we will find out who did this. we'll find out why they did this. any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice. >> charlie: in a written statement a white house official said a
. >> charlie: in a written statement a white house official said any event with multiple explosive devices as this appears to be is clearly an act of terror and will be approached as an act of terror. we continue this evening with the cbs evening news coverage with scott pele. >> the explosion went off at the most crowded point in the race. 12 seconds later, there was a second explosion just a couple blocks away. >> so terrifying, so scary. it was so loud. >> i just walked away, 15 feet away, 20 feet, and, you know, a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panicking. >> reporter: jonathan elias from boston station wbz was nearby. >> body parts. people were blown apart. >> multiple people down here. i don't know what the cause is. standby. >> reporter: police rushed to assist victims tangled in debris and broken glass some missing limbs. bloody spectators were carried into the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. >> there was some bad-looking people. i'm praying for all of them. we are all trying to put press
get available to us. >> charlie: coverage from the cbs evening news with scott pele earlier this evening. we turn now to north korea and a conversation with michele flournoy a former senior defense department official about where the crisis in north korea stands. >> my worry is on the north korean side you have kim jung-un who is a very young inexperienced leader, the question is will he know when to stop? his father, hi grandfather knew up to... how to walk up to the line but stop short of war. the question is will he know how to do this or will he miscalculate because if he goes up the escalation ladder because of the geography, because of the tens of thousands of artillery aimed at seoul, the first hour of a full-out conflict would be very deadly for both sides. you would be very quickly into a full-scale war. that's the real concern. it's miscalculation. >> charlie: we conclude this evening with a look at the results of the venezuelan election with who hey cast need a, greg grandin and nikolas kozloff. >> i think his charisma was off the charts. that's not a bad thing. i
committee. >> this, my fear is, charlie, if we let this go and it widens in use, that chaos, the refugee problem, the humanitarian crisis that it causes, the sheer deaths out there, horrible violent debt of chemical weapons all further destabilizes a region where we have lots of al his and lots of responsibilities, and we can do small, and effective now and prevent big and ugly later and we ought to do that in a way again this is not a military operation, i want to make that very clear, but we do need to step up to the plate when it comes to leadership, both for the opposition and our arab league partners. >> also this evening a full conversation about online education, something called math open online courses. >> we talk to anant agarwal, amy guttman, tom friedman and joel klein. >> i do think that the blended model is the one that we can say with certainty is revolutionizing higher education now and actually k through 12 as well. i think it is still, we are not online. because it takes an exceptional person to be so motivated and so creative to do something online and get the same thi
on the marathon explosions, follow us on twitter@abc two and charlie from abc 2, we will updates throughout the course of the day. we tweeted out pakistani taliban denied responsibility or wrong doing in the series of explosions yesterday in boston. >>> star bucks and wal-mart can help you get ahead in college. how the program offerd with the companies can get you closer towards earning a degree. >>> the weather might be gray but winter's wrath is over in the u.s. nasty storm hitting minnesota once again, bringing with it snow, ice and howling winds, making a mess in major highways and interstates, three semis and a couple of cars involved in a crash, the snow played havoc on a major league baseball game. the mets and twins had to postpone because they can't play in the snow. speed is necessary when responding to an mrming but this is not the case. rescuers had to be slow and gentle trying to help this little girl who got her head stuck between two walls in china. she was sent to the hospital. should be okay. no serious injuries. so continue giggling. >>> he is a way to kill time, start sp
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here. he is a columnist for the "new york times." he's a three-time pulitzer prize winner and the author from beirut to jerusalem first published in 1989, documented his time as a reporter in lebanon israel. recently been updated to reflect the changes in the region caused by the arab awake things. he writes i invite you to read this book to understand the identities, aspirations and passions that endure in the middle east and explore the old forces interacting with the new forces. i'm pleased to have tom friedman back at this table. >> pleasessed to be here charlie, thank you. >> rose: way back when i did an interview with you. also today when i know a friend of mine from wherever they come say i'm going to beirut say start with this. this is one of the things you ought to go and now it's been updated. you updated it because you wanted to reflect from a foundation the ideas that has been expressed there and how they are interacting with new ideas. >> you know charlie fo
♪ >> good morning. this is a special edition of "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose with gale king and scott pelley. breaking news from brochoston. >> here is what we know at this hour. one suspect in monday's marathon bombing killed overnight. police searching for the other in watertown, massachusetts, right now. west of boston. hundreds of thousands of people in neighboring cities and towns are being asked to stay behind closed doors. all trains, buses and taxis in the boston area have been taken out of service. authorities now say suspectswer from be the u sel years. >> bob orr is in washington. been following the story all morning. good morning. >> good morning again, charlie. the focus right now is on the manhunt which is centered in watertown, massachusetts. and it's an urgent press by authorities. they know the man they are looking for is very dangerous. and potentially armed with explosives. we know he has weapons and we also know if the fbi is right and he's one of the two marathon bombers, we know he's demonstrated a willingness to kill and maim. this is a picture from th
in your life does for a living. charlie: by the way, before we get into the steve cohen story, this is what he really means. they control 80% of the financial risk in financial assets, baby of the world. when you have that much concentrated risk in those new players, you have a chance of something going bad. it is a fairly significant chance. is it more than 50%? no. look at what happened with the london whale. insignificant in terms of jpmorgan earnings. guess what, that bad trade with unnoticed. liz: i want you guys to listen to this. this is what bernanke just said. wholesale funding markets remain vulnerable to runs that could in turn trigger destabilizing fire sales. charlie: he is talking about something that happened at mf global where you had investors worried about one for making a trade. john corzine's bet on ical yet and spanish bonds. getting out in the market and then investors -- he made that that. he made that two years ago. if you kept it for two years, it would have been profitable. because of what happened in europe, people got scared. his creditors, every ba
. this is interesting to me right now. as we see, we have a bigger jump, charlie, in just the last half an hour or so. maybe half the world woke up. charlie: it was yesterday. liz: yesterday after the bell. it opened more nicely at the start today. charlie: that is good for ackman. liz: all of a sudden it was up. almost 14% right now. okay. charlie: that is good for ackman. maybe there is some value here. liz: okay. there is value in your next story. it is exclusive and it is breaking. charlie: there is a reason why a lot of people inside sec capital -- if you are in a hedge fund, you can only pull your money out at certain periods of time. the last one was in february. the next one is mid-may. a lot of investors are looking at that wondering if they should pull out given that there is an investigation. here is what people inside the firm are saying. they are saying everything in the end will be okay. i am not saying that. here is why inside the firm, though, they are telling people that they feel pretty good. the government, apparently, from what i understand, more than five years of ims, e-mails, i
'm pleased to have tom friedman back at this table. >> pleasessed to be here charlie, thank you. >> rose: way back when i did an interview with you. also today when i know a friend of mine from wherever they come say i'm going to beirut i say start with this. this is one of the things you ought to go and now it's been updated. you updated it because you wanted to reflect from a foundation the ideas that has been expressed there and how they are interacting with new ideas. >> you know charlie for probably almost 20 years my publisher jonathan used to say to me you should update the book. we did it once after oslo and i said i will update but it will be new forward beirut to uses level, one page one line. nothing has changed. but in the wake of the arab spring somebody very big has changed. there's been a tendency i think in analyzing the arab spring to say it's over it's finished a disaster, i told you so but i told you so. i told you so. and my attitude is i don't need to be the first on my block to announce that, you know, this is a finished, over, etcetera. it's if i would say a disa
'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in boston. norah, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. it's a tough morning here in boston. here is the front page of "the boston globe" it says marathon terror with a gruesome picture on the cover. i can tell you just walking here this morning, they have not cleaned up the runners route yet because it'sstill an active crime scene. we'll have incredible stories of heroism to show you this morning as well. i want to bring you the latest on the investigation. we do have new information this morning. the fbi has taken over the investigation. there's also one person of interest who is under guard at a local hospital. last night police searched his apartment in a nearby city. they seized several items. we should note that the two bombs went off with no warning yesterday near the finish line where i'm standing of the boston marathon. three people were killed. at least 144 others have been treated for injuries. doctors say at least 17 are in critical condition this morning. we heard the white house yesterday. they are calling these bombings an act
the costs are getting big are by the day. to ben stein, gerri willis, charlie gasperino. >> 24,000 people in california are hired to interpret obamacare? nancy pelosi doesn't understand it, the health care industry has been trying to understand it and can't do it. the bottom line, and i'm looking at it it from the consumers point of view, your costs are only going up some 68 million people are probably going to lose their corporate sponsored health care as a result of obama-- >> how many? >> 68 million. >> at least we're going to create 21,000 jobs in california. is that really the bottom, bottom line? there's more it to this than economics? >> happened to take two minutes out of my life and started reading the 63 pages. rules for navigators and shut down after the second page. the same thing happening since day one. we were told we had to figure out what was going to be in it. we knew what was going to come. it's going to be much higher costs, all kinds of regulations and mandates, we'll get the surprises by the week, whether it's a $63 fee for just to have a fee or this. i can't imagine
. charles payne, dagen mcdowell. adam lashinsky, charlie gasperino, charles payne. >> the president said not by a single dime. he was telling the truth, it's a lot of dimes. how many dimes are in a trillion? i've been saying this from day one, everyone watching this show who has jumped on the band wagon and grabbed a torch and the evil rich is responsible for this, be careful after you go from mansion to mansion to mansion they'll get smaller, hey, they're in front of my house! you're going to have to pay up, too, you're evil and you'll have to pay the money and this is a utopia and he's in front of the trailer park now. >> he's front of the trailer park. >> and this is so good because it proves that he is a class wearer, he hates, or doesn't hate, he's going after every class. you think about it, the payroll tax hit everybody, one of the most regressive taxes is imposed by president obama where he raised taxes on everybody, and you know-- >> that was the payroll tax that people cut for two years. >> right. >> it was put back in play and everyone felt it. >> right. >> and after a lot new
: the tragedy in boston and the new production of julius caesar when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: ♪ giv ♪ now are times that we need to share ♪ ♪ we're on our way back home >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is day two of the boston marathon tragedy, the day after the tragedy, where two bombs exploded, three people died and more than 150 were injured. the world watched in horror because it happened at an international event, the running the boston marathon. all of yesterday's questions are still with us, who? why? how? how many? and where are they? and when will we find them? is it domestic or international? political or the work of a sick mind? yesterday by the end of day almost everyone had seen a video of explosion as this was a place with surveillance cameras and thousands and thousands of cell phones. yesterday the question was: how does a city take care of its injured and dead? yesterday was one more exam
morning, charlie. did you catch the masters? >> i loved it. >> what an incredible finish. >> an aussie win. >>> in north korea, it is a day of celebration and a nervous one for many of its neighbors. this is north korea's biggest holiday, the birthday of its founder. the united states and its allies are watching for a possible missile test to mark the holiday. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is willing to open up direct talks with north korea. a sign the obama administration is softening its rhetoric against the north. margaret brennan is in tokyo where they spoke to secretary kerry. margaret, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. well, north korea says that japan will be its first target if they go to war. and secretary of state john kerry was here trying to reassure the japanese that the u.s. will defend them. but also to discuss ways to get north korea to abandon its nuclear program. the scene in the north korean capital was more festive than militant today. as thousands laid wreaths at the tomb of north korea's founder, kim il-sung. he'd be 101 toda
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by >> rose: this easter marked 15 years since senator george mitchell mediated an end to the centuries old sectarian conflict in northern ireland. in 1998, the good friday agreement stands as a historical example demonstrating that peace is possible even in the most difficult circumstances. such fate has thus far eluded the middle east. in 2009 mitchell took on the challenge of brokering peace between the israelis and palestinians but for both parties peace remains harder than war. president obama's recent visit to israel has renewed hope for resolving the conflict. i'm pleased to have senator george mitchell back at this table to talk about where he sees things today. welcome. >> thank you, charlie, good to be back. >> rose: you just made a speech and and have blilt and you said "i will firmly say that there is no such thing as a conflict that cannot be solved." >> i believe that. i believe that every conflict is created, conducted, sustained by humans and
was injured, but not a person of interest. charlie and norah. >> we have john miller, formerueller, former fbi director. >> they are looking at a lot of photographs. a couple of them they have seen they have high interest in. these are photographs that are immediately before the bombings or minutes before the bombings where they see an individual with packages who they think is a possible match for the bomber. with more than one photograph with more than one individual. they are trying to go through digital evidence will we find a picture of our guy. >> this particular photograph people are making note of this morning. it looks like if you look in that area there, it looks like a package in front of the speck spectators. most of the spectators had a blast from the back of them. the blasts of their legs were injured. what do we think of something like this? >> the forensics are telling us there are many shards of a black nylon bag, the container of the pressure cooker bag. what you see there is a bright orange bag. it's worth looking at. but i think you already hinted the
, charlie. we'll start in boston. >> new details in the bombing investigation. investigators in southern russia, talking to the parents of the tsavraev brothers. tamerlan sar ever bought gun powder from a new hampshire store in february. >> his uncle says he fell under the influence of a man known as misha. also on tuesday, funerals were held for the youngest victims. 8-year-old martin richard and sean collier. he is the m.i.t. police officer gunned down on thursday night. we start our coverage with don dahler in boston. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. good morning to the viewers in the west. a memorial service will be held for slain m.i.t. police officer sean collier. thousands of police officers from around the country are expected to attend, as is vice president joe biden. meanwhile, investigators looking more closely at the two men believed to be at the center of this bomb plot. a plot that they believe may have been in the works for weeks. authorities are trying to determine whether zok har and t tamerlan tsavraev used gun powder to make the bombs. tamerlan tsavraev wa
. >> good morning, charlie. everyone waking up in the west we are learning new details about yesterday's bombing at the boston marathon. the bombings killed three people and we've learned now injured more than 150 others. authorities just held a news conference a short time ago. updating the investigation and here is a portion of that briefing. >> it's important to clarify that two and only two explosive devices were found yesterday. other parcels, all other parcels in the area of the blast have been examined but there are no unexploded bombs there were no unexploded explosive devices found. >> and the head of boston's fbi also said this morning they know of no additional threats at this time, but to expect an enhanced police presence. on monday's explosion, happens without warning, they cause chaos in a day when boston was supposed to be celebrating, jeff glor here with more. >> good morning. it is difficult to describe just what the marathon means to the city. but this morning, even more difficult to process why someone would do this. it was the final stretch. the fi
to update on the updates, breaking news by following us on twitter,@abc 2 alert and follow me@charlie from abc 2. you reached out and grieved through facebook. we asked if you could say anything to those injured or mourn those lost, the posts have been flooding in overnight. join the controversy by going to abc 2 news.com slash facebook. >> this morning, stepping out, we are dry, we look at the most powerful radar, we have all the sweeps on, not a lot to scan, dry weather will continue for most of the day. there is a potential for a slight chance for a shower in the forecast. take the umbrella with you in case. this morning, we are dry, that's food news out there. 52 degrees now, union bridge, that's a silver lining. the tps above average, we have the winds south and east for today at 7 miles an hour, union bridge, picking up through time. 54 degrees, arnold, our last stop on the temperature tour this morning, clarksville , the temperatures coming in 53 degrees now. we are talking about 70s throughout the day. your high temperature, but let's get you there t>,vslowly surely. by lunchtime 6
author charlie leduff says we shouldn't give up on detroit although he seemed awfully eager to come to new york to tell me that scientists discovered a new tarantula that is the size of a human face. correction, the size of a screaming human face. [laughter] this is stephen "the colbert re. ["the colbert report" theme music playing] captioning sponsored by comedy central [cheers and applause] >> stephen: thank you so much. welcome to the report. everybody. [chowd] [crowd chanting stephen! >> jon: thank you so much. thank you, everybody. folks, i have to say you are excited. i'm excited. i'm still coming down from last night's interview with bill clinton. i made prerecorded history when i got the president to join twitter and tweet using the handle prez billy jeff. just 24 hours as of 7:00 he has over 88,000 followers. [cheers and applause] boom! that is called the colbert bump, mr. president. [cheers and applause] welcome to the big time, my friend. the next time you are visiting one of your agricultural projects in uganda the villagers are going to go, hey, you are that dude from c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 523 (some duplicates have been removed)